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Amazing
#1
yet another board free of posts. I shall the one to defile it, hahaha.
On to the topic at hand.

I think it is absolutely amazing the architecture the ancients constructed. Everything from the pyramids, ziggurats, the huge temples in Greece, the Colosseum.
I mean look at the Parthenon. Not only is it stunning to look at, it is designed to use optical illusions to make it look better. I am always amazed at how the ancients constructed their monuments.

Of course I have seen too many space shows saying aliens had something to do with it Laugh1
In the end, it boils down to two simple choices. Either you do or you don't. You'd think with all the problems in this world, there'd be more answers. It's not fair... but its the way things are. The choice is yours. ~ Zidane Tribal

Hope is comforting, it allows us to accept fate no matter how tragic it may be. ~ Yunalesca

"Απο μακρυά και αγαπημένοι παρά απο κοντά και μαλωμένοι"

There's not a word yet, for old friends who've just met ~ Gonzo
#2
I can spend hours wandering and admiring the architecture of the buildings not only the monuments which one expects to be amazing.

Parthenon has been imitated in other building which is kind of cool,
it has become a symbol of advanced architecture. I mean if you want to make something looking important Parthenon is the look you go for.... look at some new building , like court houses ect they resemble Parthenon.

Petra in Jordan is also just an amazing site i want to visit!

I always had one question about the pyramids though... I know what they were build for but.... Why the Egyptian empire will spend all this money time and peoples lives to built so many of them whilst they could use their power to expand their empire further like the Romans and Greeks did? I know they were not indifferent to world domination. Rolleyes


Time spent being less than happy is time waistedWavey

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#3
spotysocks Wrote:I always had one question about the pyramids though... I know what they were build for but.... Why the Egyptian empire will spend all this money time and peoples lives to built so many of them whilst they could use their power to expand their empire further like the Romans and Greeks did? I know they were not indifferent to world domination. Rolleyes

i read a very interesting book called "the pyramid" by ismail kadare, an albanian writer. the idea there was that the pyramid was built as a means of providing the people with a goal, to keep them working so that the control of the pharaoh and his council could be total. to control what they think, what they do, what they say - it was more the idea of pyramid that they wanted to exploit, and it being the pharaoh's tomb was only the secondary purpose. great ideas in that book!

as for architecture, think of today's "pure form" approach in contrast with, say, the precision and careful craftsmanship of the gothic style or art nouveau's undulating and floral motifs... who bothers to think about ornaments anymore?... i'm not saying it as a critique but as an observation. one thing is for sure: there will probably never be another sagrada familia!!! (not that this one is completed...). for those of you who don't know, here is a link to some pictures of it http://www.sobi.org/photos/places/Barcel...index.html Confusedmile:
#4
spotysocks Wrote:Parthenon has been imitated in other building which is kind of cool,
it has become a symbol of advanced architecture. I mean if you want to make something looking important Parthenon is the look you go for.... look at some new building , like court houses ect they resemble Parthenon.

Yayy I've been there! I hugged one of the columns and everything. Twas pretty mind boggling, tbh. Stood next to this massive fucking icon. Makes you feel well tiny. (Especially when you start hugging it.)

And pocket_pilgrim doesn't half know his stuff! :biggrin:
#5
Wilem Wrote:Yayy I've been there! I hugged one of the columns and everything. Twas pretty mind boggling, tbh. Stood next to this massive fucking icon. Makes you feel well tiny. (Especially when you start hugging it.)

And pocket_pilgrim doesn't half know his stuff! :biggrin:

i've not seen the parthenon, but i have seen the pantheon in rome :biggrin: 'twas a cloudy day but, as i was inside, the sunlight filtered in through the oculus and a bewitching spectacle unfurled before my very eyes. and i have it on camera to prove it - even if it does capture just 10% of the actual sight! (see attachment)

and i must say i have a bit of advantage here as i'm studying architecture Wink


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#6
Quote: and i must say i have a bit of advantage here as i'm studying architecture Wink

I have suggested architecture as a new topic because of YOU! But then you were gone... nice to see you back :biggrin:


Time spent being less than happy is time waistedWavey

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#7
spotysocks Wrote:I have suggested architecture as a new topic because of YOU! But then you were gone... nice to see you back :biggrin:

awwww that really is sweet! here's a big kiss for you Smlove2 Kissa

sorry, did i use too much tongue? :redface:
#8
There are many amazing architecture in this world, England has the famous stone circle at Stonehenge, Wiltshire.

Stonehenge is probably the most important prehistoric monument in the whole of Britain. It stands as a timeless monument to the people who built it.
Who thought of the idea in the first place, how do you convince people to help to build it. How much did it cost to erect and what labour was use.

The stonehenge that we see today is the final stage that was completed about 3500 years ago. ( Will problably last another 3500 years, if we dont nuke ourselves).

Stonehenge was constructed in three phases. I believe this is the largest community building project ever commissioned in England and without planning premission.

The second and most dramatic stage of Stonehenge started around 2150 BC. Some 82 bluestones from the Preseli mountains, in south-west Wales were transported to the site. It is thought these stones, some weighing 4 tonnes each were dragged on rollers and sledges to the headwaters on Milford Haven and then loaded onto rafts. They were carried by water along the south coast of Wales and up the rivers Avon and Frome, before being dragged overland again to near Warminster in Wiltshire. The final stage of the journey was mainly by water, down the river Wylye to Salisbury, then the Salisbury Avon to west Amesbury.

This astonishing journey covers nearly 240 miles. Once at the site, these stones were set up in the centre to form an incomplete double circle. ( During the same period the original entrance of the circular earthwork was widened and a pair of Heel Stones were erected. Also the nearer part of the Avenue was built, aligned with the midsummer sunrise.) Just think of the planning, the expertise and construction elements of this project is mind blowing. No plans or drawings were use as these people could not read or write, the experts tells us. Just using their knowledge which was passed down by word of mouth by each generation.

It has been estimated that the three phases of the construction required more than thirty million hours of labour. Speculation on the reason it was built range from human sacrifice to astronomy, also a docking station for alien spaceships.

[Image: Summer_Solstice_Sunrise_over_Stonehenge_2005.jpg]


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