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Firearms
#1
So I have been giving some thought to buying a firearm and getting a concealed carry permit. Yes, you did read that right. There's been a number of disturbing things going on in my local area and seems people are getting bolder as time moves on. This would be of course for self defense.

There's of course pros and cons to it. The cons are pretty easy to pick out but some are not quite as obvious. Seems one of the bigger things to understand is when you're allow (with a permit) to carry a concealed firearm and it varies by state, if you're in close proximity to a school or government building, etc. Another is when it is appropriate to pull a gun on someone who is posing a threat to you. In many cases you might find yourself in a lot of trouble. For instance, someone gets in a fist fight and one pull a gun on them. In that case the guy who pulled out a gun is going to be in a lot of trouble most likely.

Of course there's training, which is imperative. You have to be safe with guns. All the accidents with guns are caused by people who thought, but didn't check, their gun was not loaded. And you have to be able to use a gun, hit a target, etc, otherwise why bother.

It is something I have to consider think about. A good 9mm pistol goes for $400-600. Applying for a permit to purchase is cheap, applying for a conceal carry permit is a bit more expensive and you have to go do a class (which I presume costs a good bit as well). Likewise, one will want to go to a gun range become more familiar with the firearm, target practice, etc.

That all being said, some of you might think I'm going to be another Yosemite Sam and going yee haw, bang bang... That's not what this is about. I'm seeing disturbing trends in this area with crime, some petty stuff and some more serious and violent. I have no interest in accumulating firearms, or AR-13's and assault rifles. As crazy as this might sound across the pond I do live in a country and in a region where guns are a plenty. Not necessarily coming from the doomsday thing, but I do think the economic fallout will result in more problems.

That being said, I think the pros to having a firearm is of course self-defense. Of course with that comes with a lot of potential problems, many of them being legal problems. I am curious what others do think, especially those of us who are in the US.
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#2
While I’m completely anti-gun, trash the 2. amendment, make assault weapons illegal kind of guy, I understand that there are areas in the US where a gun is part of someone’s life for good reason.

However as someone who also suffers from depressions, however well they seem to be managed, having ready access to a gun could prove lethal.
The additional self confidence a gun provides could also lead you into more dangerous situations, instead of avoiding these situations in the first place. Especially if alcohol is in the picture.

On the other hand, you could meet someone during training, practice...
Bernd

Being gay is not for Sissies.
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#3
@Bhp91126 I think some of the points you make are good, particularly about depression. Certainly something to think about in addition to all the other factors.

I think it is very unwise for someone to keep a firearm so they can put themselves in dangerous situations intentionally, like going into a bad part of town you would normally avoid. Or acting all pompous like you're the big guy in town. For instance if someone gets in an argument with me and wants to get in a fist fight with me and starts swinging, you can't pull your gun on that person, you would be in a lot of trouble in that case.

When it comes to NC. If you drink alcohol it nullifies your conceal carry permit and can get in a lot of trouble. There's also laws specifically dealing with having a firearm at places where alcohol is served... I'll have to double check but I don't think you're allowed to have a concealed firearm in a bar but I might be wrong, definitely cannot consume alcohol because I'm pretty sure that is a misdemeanor at the least. I think a lot of states have laws concerning firearms and alcohol. I did hear that Montana makes it illegal period to be in possession of a gun in a bar, CCW or not.

For me, it's strictly for home/self-defense. As for assault weapons, it is sort of a buzzword at times. At the same time there should be limits on what people should be able to get a hold of. Perhaps a tiered permit? I don't know, but I am learning more about all this stuff.
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#4
When I took a gun safety class, it was run by a gun-shop owner. He was an NRA nutter-butter who one-breath away from calling the anti-gun lobby Reptilian aliens from the Draconis System. If you want a gun license, do what you got to do, but keep in mind there's a chance you might have to grin and bear the "safety" class, and get more training on safety and laws on your own.
[-] The following 1 member Likes Chase's post:
  • InbetweenDreams
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#5
I'm sure the quality of the class varies quite a bit. What I have been surprised by for the most part are the youtube channels. Most that I have seen seem to really push the safety issue. The law aspect is definitely a thing, especially if you travel. Many states recognize reciprocity, but not all and depends from which state. For instance if you're driving down the interstate in New York and drive over into New Jersey, you've committed a felony. On the other hand, if you're in Georgia and drive in North Carolina, you're fine.

I'm nowhere close to making a choice really. I mean consider this. Here in North Carolina there is the castle doctrine, which essentially means if someone were break into your home, car, business you can use deadly force in most cases. Like if someone breaks in at 2 AM, whether the person is armed or not, you can use deadly force. That being said, you can bet your ass there will be an investigation. There will be attorneys, there will be judges, etc...it will be an expensive ordeal regardless. Of course, laws vary in different states, so you a DA could file charges and you could be sitting in jail for protecting yourself. That being said, knowing when you can and should use deadly force is important and does worry me that some people may not understand the laws well enough.

I guess the question is whether or not I am inviting more potential problems and risk versus having personal protection. One thought that really concerns me is an accidental discharge, at best it might be a hole in the wall, at worst someone could be hurt or killed due to any negligence on my part. So definitely some things I need to work through before I decide whether or not to go through with it.
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#6
(05-14-2021, 11:15 PM)Bhp91126 Wrote: While I’m completely anti-gun, trash the 2. amendment, make assault weapons illegal kind of guy, I understand that there are areas in the US where a gun is part of someone’s life for good reason.

However as someone who also suffers from depressions, however well they seem to be managed, having ready access to a gun could prove lethal.
The additional self confidence a gun provides could also lead you into more dangerous situations, instead of avoiding these situations in the first place. Especially if alcohol is in the picture.

On the other hand, you could meet someone during training, practice...
I often wonder when encountering the American view of firearm possession if the entire nation has lost its sanity.
Here in Australia we have very strict and very limited laws covering firearms held by civilians. The vastly lower incidents of fatal shootings per head of population compared to ‘the Land of the Brave and the Free’ tells us something.
The 2nd amendment may have made sense when it was first written but the context and meaning have changed since then.
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#7
@Karl Rand

Saying that there is less shootings because less people have guns is not telling me anything. It's the same as saying there's less car wrecks because less people drive cars. Of course that's true. Does that mean there's less crime, less violence?

Trite statements about guns in the US and the 2nd amendment doesn't impress me. Same goes for your snarky remarks about the "nation has lost its sanity" and "the land of the brave and the free." I'm fine for discussing the issues but don't come on here and be a jerk just because you disagree with something.
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#8
(05-17-2021, 11:01 AM)InbetweenDreams Wrote: @Karl Rand

Saying that there is less shootings because less people have guns is not telling me anything. It's the same as saying there's less car wrecks because less people drive cars. Of course that's true. Does that mean there's less crime, less violence?

Trite statements about guns in the US and the 2nd amendment doesn't impress me. Same goes for your snarky remarks about the "nation has lost its sanity" and "the land of the brave and the free." I'm fine for discussing the issues but don't come on here and be a jerk just because you disagree with something.
Please read my post again. I said ‘per head of population’ This has a specific meaning I suggest you’ve either missed or misunderstood. 
My comment ‘nation has lost it’s sanity’ wasn’t snarky but something I've experienced as regretably true. I’ve been visiting the US since my mid 20’s some 50 years ago so have some idea of the profound changes that have taken place.
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#9
Of course things have changed in 50 years, a great deal of things have changed and not just here in the US...What profound changes are you talking about?

The incidence of fatal shootings should be lower in a country that prohibits citizens possessing guns, but there are other factors outside of gun laws/rights that have an effect on violent crimes, murder, etc. Yes other countries that allow their citizens the own and carry firearms may have lower rates of fatalities by firearms than the US, some might have overall less violent crime than the US as well. We also have to consider that other countries may not report these statistics equally.

That being said, I do think it is a reasonable consideration for me to purchase a firearm for personal protection. Of course that is imply getting the appropriate training. Afterall I do live in a country where many people do own and carry a weapon, most are good guys and some might not be. Does it mean I intend to purchase a gun? No, not necessarily.
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#10
(05-17-2021, 01:37 PM)InbetweenDreams Wrote: Of course things have changed in 50 years, a great deal of things have changed and not just here in the US...What profound changes are you talking about?

The incidence of fatal shootings should be lower in a country that prohibits citizens possessing guns, but there are other factors outside of gun laws/rights that have an effect on violent crimes, murder, etc. Yes other countries that allow their citizens the own and carry firearms may have lower rates of fatalities by firearms than the US, some might have overall less violent crime than the US as well. We also have to consider that other countries may not report these statistics equally.

That being said, I do think it is a reasonable consideration for me to purchase a firearm for personal protection. Of course that is imply getting the appropriate training. Afterall I do live in a country where many people do own and carry a weapon, most are good guys and some might not be. Does it mean I intend to purchase a gun? No, not necessarily.
You may live in a country where many people do own and carry a weapon, most are good guys and some might not. Can't you see the circular argument in that statement? 
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