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Firearms
#11
@Karl Rand What's there to argue? If many people did carry guns and presumably some bad people also carried guns, wouldn't you want to carry a gun?

See here's the thing. I'm not going to play games. Either you came here to have a discussion or you came here to troll. So, perhaps you can explain what it is that you dislike about guns in America in greater detail. Perhaps you can dive into whatever it is you say has profoundly changed in the US, I'm genuinely curious.
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#12
(05-18-2021, 05:04 AM)InbetweenDreams Wrote: @Karl Rand What's there to argue? If many people did carry guns and presumably some bad people also carried guns, wouldn't you want to carry a gun?
If was living in the US and a US Citizen I'd have migrated to Australia (or wherever) some time ago as have a number of ex americans now living near me.
My builder saw the writing on the wall 27 years ago departing Florida for Nth Tasmania. The opinion he’s formed of an America armed to the teeth become more negative every time he visits his relatives.  He’s no longer willing to have his children with him when he visits ‘home’.
I have however, learnt long ago there’s little point in attempting to introduce US gun advocates to anything like sanity. All I can say is God help America. 
---end of discussion on my part
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#13
(05-18-2021, 06:45 AM)Karl Rand Wrote: If was living in the US and a US Citizen I'd have migrated to Australia (or wherever) some time ago as have a number of ex americans now living near me. My builder saw the writing on the wall 27 years ago departing Florida for Nth Tasmania.

It's already too late for most of us. Immigrating to Australia has been becoming increasingly harder. I have a relative in Melbourne who said Australia would be great for me, but she moved before I was born. I looked into it, and moving to Australia is difficult. Moving to the US is certainly hard for many people as it is, but Australia presently has an immigration system that is so selective, many far-right anti-immigration advocates in the US use it as an example of their preferred immigration system. For me, moving to Australia is incredibly hard because my career-field isn't on Australia's list of skill-shortages, and I'm from a working class family with tons of student loan debt that I can't declare bankruptcy on.

Sadly, the "writing on the wall" in America goes deeper than just gun issues. The US is succumbing to levels of income inequality that dwarf that of feudalism. Healthcare costs are astronomically price-gauged, with many Americans dying from not even being able to afford insulin, something that cost dollars to make.

That though, is a whole different ball of wax.
May the memory of the Russian and Jewish refugees of Shanghai live on forever, in eternal friendship between the Jewish and Chinese people.
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#14
(05-18-2021, 06:45 AM)Karl Rand Wrote: If was living in the US and a US Citizen I'd have migrated to Australia (or wherever) some time ago as have a number of ex americans now living near me.
My builder saw the writing on the wall 27 years ago departing Florida for Nth Tasmania. The opinion he’s formed of an America armed to the teeth become more negative every time he visits his relatives.  He’s no longer willing to have his children with him when he visits ‘home’.

So you think the sole problem in America is people with guns?

(05-18-2021, 06:45 AM)Karl Rand Wrote: I have however, learnt long ago there’s little point in attempting to introduce US gun advocates to anything like sanity. All I can say is God help America. 
---end of discussion on my part

Right, so you expect a civil discussion by being insulting. That's my problem with this. You have an opinion that doesn't favor citizens having firearms, fine, great...grand! This is a forum, not Facebook. We have people from many countries covering every continent (excluding Antarctica). I don't go around insulting other people or cultural practices, even if I disagree with it or find it ridiculous. Firearms, 2nd Amendment, like it or not, is a cultural phenomena in the USA, that's the way it is.

When you say shit like this...

Quote:My comment ‘nation has lost it’s sanity’ wasn’t snarky but something I've experienced as regretably true. I’ve been visiting the US since my mid 20’s some 50 years ago so have some idea of the profound changes that have taken place.

You're not having a debate any longer. You cannot expect me, as an American, to take you seriously when you assert that a nation of 330 million people have collectively gone insane.

(05-18-2021, 03:20 PM)Chase Wrote: It's already too late for most of us. Immigrating to Australia has been becoming increasingly harder. I have a relative in Melbourne who said Australia would be great for me, but she moved before I was born. I looked into it, and moving to Australia is difficult. Moving to the US is certainly hard for many people as it is, but Australia presently has an immigration system that is so selective, many far-right anti-immigration advocates in the US use it as an example of their preferred immigration system. For me, moving to Australia is incredibly hard because my career-field isn't on Australia's list of skill-shortages, and I'm from a working class family with tons of student loan debt that I can't declare bankruptcy on.

Sadly, the "writing on the wall" in America goes deeper than just gun issues. The US is succumbing to levels of income inequality that dwarf that of feudalism. Healthcare costs are astronomically price-gauged, with many Americans dying from not even being able to afford insulin, something that cost dollars to make.

That though, is a whole different ball of wax.

That's exactly what I'm getting to. The problems we face as a nation is inequality, health care, education, mental health and so on. Immigration is expensive and difficult in many countries. Even moving north to Canada isn't particularly easy, or the UK for that matter. Plus you may find yourself discriminated against because you're an immigrant from the US depending on what country you go to.

You don't have to have a gun to commit heinous acts such as this...

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-ne...-in-sydney

Very sad and disturbing.
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#15
So, I am in the US. I also now own a weapon. I am not anti gun but never wanted to own one. However during this most recent election a gun store in my county was actually robbed. At the time there was also a lot of threats swirling around due to the potential outcome of the election. 

I had a lot of thoughts. Bringing a gun into my home only heightens the chance of gun violence now. Also my state is probably the most lax in the US, after maybe Texas, about guns. So it was an easy process for me to obtain a pistol. 

I formerly trained with pistols and shotguns and the varying laws with where you can carry a weapon. The varying state laws are too different for me to keep up with so I decided this will just be for at home protection. Learning to clean the piece and up keep it was honestly rather easy. And storage was easy because I don’t live with many people. That would be my only fear and big con. The people in your home and how they might react to seeing a weapon. If you live alone though this might not come up.
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#16
That is true, not everyone in your family will like the fact that you have a gun. I'm considering how to approach that aspect. The best practice would be to assume you have a 3 year old niece on the loose in your house, likewise you wouldn't want kids or anyone to accidentally get a hold of a firearm. The thought of something like that happening almost makes me sick, easily preventable. Safety is huge concern of mine...
[-] The following 1 member Likes InbetweenDreams's post:
  • The Goof
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#17
(05-19-2021, 08:07 PM)InbetweenDreams Wrote: That is true, not everyone in your family will like the fact that you have a gun. I'm considering how to approach that aspect. The best practice would be to assume you have a 3 year old niece on the loose in your house, likewise you wouldn't want kids or anyone to accidentally get a hold of a firearm. The thought of something like that happening almost makes me sick, easily preventable. Safety is huge concern of mine...

agreed ! Mine is in a box/case that is locked. The gun itself is also stored with the trigger locked.  I’m also the tallest person in my family, so it’s in a place only I can reach. I know some people elect to get safes for their weapons but seeing as I only have the one the locked case was my best bet. I only live with one other adult but if kids came into the equation I would probably get a safe. You just never know.
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#18
(05-18-2021, 03:20 PM)Chase Wrote: Sadly, the "writing on the wall" in America goes deeper than just gun issues. The US is succumbing to levels of income inequality that dwarf that of feudalism. Healthcare costs are astronomically price-gauged, with many Americans dying from not even being able to afford insulin, something that cost dollars to make.

That though, is a whole different ball of wax.
This is a topic worthy of a detailed discussion - on another thread if you’d like to start one.
Putting aside for now the right/left arguments for and against so called free enterprise I’d be fascinated to know the actual cost to the US economy of having a large percentage of the population rendered so ill &/or injured their unemployable.
I can hear Ayn Rand rolling in her grave at the mere suggestion. In my specific case I know if I hadn’t a gov’t subsidised medical benefits scheme behind me during some periods on the planet I’d be living on the streets or dead.
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#19
(05-19-2021, 08:19 PM)The Goof Wrote:
(05-19-2021, 08:07 PM)InbetweenDreams Wrote: That is true, not everyone in your family will like the fact that you have a gun. I'm considering how to approach that aspect. The best practice would be to assume you have a 3 year old niece on the loose in your house, likewise you wouldn't want kids or anyone to accidentally get a hold of a firearm. The thought of something like that happening almost makes me sick, easily preventable. Safety is huge concern of mine...

agreed ! Mine is in a box/case that is locked. The gun itself is also stored with the trigger locked.  I’m also the tallest person in my family, so it’s in a place only I can reach. I know some people elect to get safes for their weapons but seeing as I only have the one the locked case was my best bet. I only live with one other adult but if kids came into the equation I would probably get a safe. You just never know.
I've never been a gun owner and likely never will. I am curious if a gun is purchased for protection are you defeating the purpose by locking it in a box? For example if someone breaks into your house you have to get the key, find the box, unlock it and remove the gun, and unlock the gun. All that time may be more than you have to respond.
On a totally different tangent, does anyone know if stun guns are available for sale to the general public for protection? Wouldn't they provide security for most home invasion type incidents?
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#20
(05-21-2021, 08:35 PM)calgor Wrote: I've never been a gun owner and likely never will. I am curious if a gun is purchased for protection are you defeating the purpose by locking it in a box? For example if someone breaks into your house you have to get the key, find the box, unlock it and remove the gun, and unlock the gun. All that time may be more than you have to respond.

You do raise a good point. If you keep a gun at home, yes, you generally would want to keep it out of reach from other family members, kids and so on. If you have a concealed carry permit you should keep the gun on you at all times. Many suggest keeping one in the chamber, but I'm not going to tell people what is best for them. Having to "rack the slide" does add response time and there are scenarios where that can put you in danger.

In North Carolina a person can purchase a gun without a concealed carry permit, but must get a purchase permit from their local Sheriff's office. In NC you are allow to conceal a firearm on your property as I understand it.

Quote:On a totally different tangent, does anyone know if stun guns are available for sale to the general public for protection? Wouldn't they provide security for most home invasion type incidents?

You can buy stun guns, but they're not always a good choice, such as in cases where someone is really close to you. Maybe they have a gun pointed at you or they're coming at you with a knife. If I were to suggest anything I would only use a Taser gun that shoots a projectile. Likewise, these weapons may require a concealed carry permit depending on your state's laws. A lot of the stuff on Amazon and alike aren't worth the time.

The thing about home invasions is there's often very little time. Stun guns, Taser guns, etc you may only have one shot to hit the intruder...whereas with a 9mm pistol you can have 12 or more shots (some magazines can hold 18 bullets depending on the size of the ammunition such as 9mm, 357 SIG, .40, etc). If you were asking me, if you're in a state with a castle doctrine, there is nothing better than a gun.

Going back to the issue of having quick access to your firearm at home, it varies. If you live alone you can simply keep it near your bed or in a drawer. However, you have to consider your options, especially with kids and so forth. I'm certainly no expert, but it is important for to keep the gun secured.
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