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The Divas
#41
Sara Montiel en España
La violetera

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#42
An interesting interview.... (in English) just get through the introduction in Dutch.... Cecilia Bartoli explains what la Malibran was all about (one of the first Divas, so we are told)



Cecilia is a diva in her own right... (not a moody one, that I know of)













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#43
Better hit Broadway for a bit:

Barbara Streisand (Hello, Dolly)



Streisand (Gotta Move)



Judy Garland (Get Happy)



Garland (Somewhere Over the Rainbow)

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#44
princealbertofb Wrote:An interesting interview.... (in English) just get through the introduction in Dutch.... Cecilia Bartoli explains what la Malibran was all about (one of the first Divas, so we are told)

I prefer Bartoli doing Handel.




The link isn't working, so is the address:

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#45
Also a beautiful choice, but since this illustrated the story of a real life other diva....


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#46
Inchante Wrote:I prefer Bartoli doing Handel.




The link isn't working, so is the address:

it would if you put in the minus sign before the m225
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#47
princealbertofb Wrote:Also a beautiful choice, but since this illustrated the story of a real life other diva....

Yes, thank you for the reposting it. I guess I must have missed the "-" when I copied it.

I have seen that series before on you tube and enjoyed it. Though, I am not the greatest fan of the particular style associated with Italian Baroque Opera (some but not all). It tends to be too ornate for my liking. I think it has something to do with the Anglo-Tutonic aspects of American Culture. There is a tendency to appreciate the profound aspects of nature which can be found in the seemingly simple, if you get my meaning.

For example, America's answer to the European art nouveau movement was the Arts and Crafts Movement:

[Image: arts-and-crafts-dining-room1.png]

[Image: victorhortastaircase.jpg]

Although, I will say that for the Italian Baroque, any movement that can produce a song like "Alto Giove" must have some quality. And, while it is a big stretch to call Jaroussky a Diva, he is worth listening to:

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#48
Re: Definition of Divas,...to add to what Inchante said already...it helps if they overcome alot of obstacles and reinvent themselves..they usually have a backbone of steel....

...and two great examples of "Suvivor Divas"


Cher...










Tina Tuner








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#49
Another amazing performance, now this is a diva.
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#50
East Wrote:Re: Definition of Divas,...to add to what Inchante said already...it helps if they overcome alot of obstacles and reinvent themselves..they usually have a backbone of steel....

When I was a freshmen in college I did a bit of a research project relating to the various facets of Gay Culture. One of the texts I read had a great deal to say about the role of a "diva' in gay culture. It has been years since I read it and I cannot even remember the name of the book, but I remember one of the quotes:

"The fantasy of the viscous, backstabbing vagina dentata, for a powerless minority, is most prominently characterized in the Diva". . . or something like that. I think, when you contemplate the attitude of a Drag Queen, bitchy, sharp witted and and even sharper tongued, you get a sense of what the Diva means in gay culture.

Diana Damrau as The Queen of the Night in Mozart's "The Magic Flute" (In this song, "Der Hölle Rache", The Queen of the Night convinces her daughter to commit fratricide)




I would put Whitney Houston's "Queen of the Night" up, but . . . no. She's been too much of a disappointment since my childhood years.
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