So far we have raised 0% of our monthly running costs! Thanks for your generosity!

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
U.S. Currency
#11
OrphanPip Wrote:I actually kind of like the design of the Canadian bills, usually it's a PM or the queen on one side, and then cultural symbols on the other side.

[Image: canada.jpg]

Here you got Sir Wilfred Laurier, a Prime Minister, on one side and children playing hockey on the other (and other winter sports).

[Image: P-102a_Canada_2001_Ten_Dollars.jpg]

Then you got Sir John A. and the war memorial in Ottawa on the back.

[Image: Canadian20.jpg]

This is the Queen on one side and Native art on the other.
I actually had no idea the Queen was important(not sure that's the right word:tongueSmile enough to other countries to be printed on some of their currency but the UK. Even if Canada is still tied to the Crown in some respects.:eek:
Silly Sarcastic So-and-so
Reply
#12
She's the head of state in Canada, but constitutionally, since 1933, she serves in that office separate from her office as Queen of England.
When a subject is highly controversial — and any question about sex is that — one cannot hope to tell the truth. One can only show how one came to hold whatever opinion one does hold. One can only give one's audience the chance of drawing their own conclusions as they observe the limitations, the prejudices, the idiosyncrasies of the speaker.
- Virginia Woolf
Reply
#13
OrphanPip Wrote:She's the head of state in Canada, but constitutionally, since 1933, she serves in that office separate from her office as Queen of England.

I like the idea of cultural markings on the Canadian currency. I also don't remember the currency in Canada being so diverse or colorful when I was a kid. Ours is one color scheme and you had better like Neoclassical design elements, as you wont get anything else. Though, I do like the fact that one does not have to be a President/Prime Minister or Royalty to be on American currency. In addition to Franklin and Hamilton, Susan B. Anthony and Sacajawea have also had their turns on coins.

It might be interesting to see artists, writers, and musicians on currency for once. I wonder if there are any nations that have such a currency.
Reply
#14
Quote:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banknotes_o...d_sterling
As of December 2011 the Bank of England banknotes in circulation are mixed series, consisting of both the revised Series E (5 and 10 pound) and the new Series F, which began on 13 March 2007 with the launch of the Adam Smith 20 pound note. This was followed by the new Boulton and Watt 50 pound note on 2 November 2011, although the Series E Houblon 50 pound note remains in circulation for the time being until it is gradually replaced and withdrawn.
The notes currently in circulation are as follows:
  • 5 pound note depicting Elizabeth Fry, showing her reading to prisoners in Newgate Prison
  • 10 pound note depicting Charles Darwin, a hummingbird and HMS Beagle
  • 20 pound note depicting Adam Smith, with an illustration of 'The division of labour in pin manufacturing' (Image)
  • 50 pound note depicting Sir John Houblon, with a view of his house in Threadneedle Street.
  • 50 pound note depicting Matthew Boulton and James Watt, with steam engine and Boulton's Soho factory.
For those curious.Confusedmile:
Silly Sarcastic So-and-so
Reply
#15
Genersis You're certainly well informed..!
[SIZE="3"][COLOR="Green"]Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”

Oscar Wilde[/COLOR][/SIZE]
Respect
Reply
#16
Genersis Wrote:For those curious.Confusedmile:

I should think that sir. Isaac Newton would be a natural choice; I wonder why they opted for--what are in my view--lesser contributors to the field of science like Watt and Boulton. And it is too bad that writers like Milton, Shakespeare, and Dickens as well as other artists are overlooked entirely . . . and why not John Locke? All of these seem to be more important and iconic figures than some mentioned above. But I suppose I am not British and what from my perspective seems significant, may not be from the perspective of the British.
Reply
#17
A clown face
[Image: BushFace+bipolar+1.jpg]
Reply
#18
Almac Wrote:Genersis You're certainly well informed..!

Nah.
I just copied and pasted from Wikipedia.:redface:
Though i'm not afraid to look up things i don't know about, or are curious of.Confusedmile:
Silly Sarcastic So-and-so
Reply
#19
Inchante Wrote:I should think that sir. Isaac Newton would be a natural choice; I wonder why they opted for--what are in my view--lesser contributors to the field of science like Watt and Boulton. And it is too bad that writers like Milton, Shakespeare, and Dickens as well as other artists are overlooked entirely . . . and why not John Locke? All of these seem to be more important and iconic figures than some mentioned above. But I suppose I am not British and what from my perspective seems significant, may not be from the perspective of the British.

To list everyone who has been on our notes since the 1970:
Isaac Newton
Duke of Wellington
Florence Nightingale
William Shakespeare
Christopher Wren
George Stephenson
Charles Dickens
Michael Faraday
John Houblon
Elizabeth Fry
Charles Darwin
Edward Elgar
Adam Smith
Matthew Boulton and James Watt

A lot of them have been phased out.
The ones i listed in my last post are the ones currently in circulation.
More info is in the link i posted in my last post.ConfusedmileSadWhen introduced, phased out ETC)
Silly Sarcastic So-and-so
Reply
#20
pellaz Wrote:A clown face
[Image: BushFace+bipolar+1.jpg]

Ummmm . . . that would be a BIG, FAT, STINKING NO!
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)