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Vsauce
#11

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#12

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#13
This is a great series of videos...

The Period Table of Videos from the University of Nottingham

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL...F36C085DE1

First video is of course, Hydrogen...




All the way to...

Ununoctium


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#14
awesome ..
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#15
the guy looks like he's had to much hydrogen in his hair .. lol ..
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#16

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#17
Not really vsauce but still a very good video that hits on a lot of things...


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#18
The biggest mistake my generation (the generation of the 1960s that opposed the war in Vietnam and advocated civil rights and a more free, just and egalitarian society) was that we VASTLY underestimated our opposition.

Like so many of my generation, at age 19 (after taking my first LSD trip on May-Day 1967, soon to be half a century ago now), I fully understood that "social reality" is a construct and, as such, can be deconstructed and reconstructed. At that time, this perception was a genuine revelation that held forth the possibility of real, meaningful, change toward a more advanced social order. What I did not yet understand, and what many of my generation did not yet understand, was the extent to which the "old social order" had established itself not only historically in the edifices of external political reality but within the internal constructs of the identified "self".

To give you some idea what I'm talking about, in October 2004, Journalist Ron Suskind published an article in the New York Times entitled, Faith, Certainty and the Presidency of George W. Bush. In that article, Suskind recounts a 2002 conversation he had with an unnamed "senior advisor to Bush," later identified as Karl Rove:

Quote:In the summer of 2002, after I had written an article in Esquire that the White House didn't like about Bush's former communications director, Karen Hughes, I had a meeting with a senior adviser to Bush. He expressed the White House's displeasure, and then he told me something that at the time I didn't fully comprehend -- but which I now believe gets to the very heart of the Bush presidency.

The aide said that guys like me were "in what we call the reality-based community," which he defined as people who "believe that solutions emerge from your judicious study of discernible reality." I nodded and murmured something about enlightenment principles and empiricism. He cut me off. "That's not the way the world really works anymore," he continued. "We're an empire now, and when we act, we create our own reality. And while you're studying that reality -- judiciously, as you will -- we'll act again, creating other new realities, which you can study too, and that's how things will sort out. We're history's actors . . . and you, all of you, will be left to just study what we do."

That quote is both factual and truthful: It establishes in fairly plain language the way government shapes political reality. But it isn't anything really new. Perhaps it seemed "new" to the Bush administration of that post-9/11 era (a manufactured event that was the sine qua non for establishing our current domestic and global political agenda)... but it is actually the way social/political "reality" has always been constructed by those who govern.

But the real and far more important question is: What underlies that social reality?

To point you in the right direction, allow me to ask you just three questions:

1) WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE?

2) DO YOU BELIEVE YOU ARE WHO YOU THINK YOU ARE?

3) DO YOU BELIEVE THAT THE LINGUISTIC CONSTRUCTS THAT SHAPE YOUR THOUGHT ARE ACCURATE REPRESENTATIONS OF OBJECTIVE REALITY?
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