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it goes numb -.-
#1
Okay so, as my introduction says (when it finally appears) I used to be very fat and I've turned that around. Im really enjoying exercising everyday and seeing my body change weekly and im getting more and more confident.. but im scared there may be a price
Cos im not rich enough to join a gym I use the only thing available which is an exercise bike in my dining room.
I exercise for 30minutes a night til I am dripping and it feels good.. but one thing doesn't.
My whole package goes numb while on the bike.. to.the point that, if I put my hands in my pants it feels like someone else's (pretty funny actually)
I want to know if thats normal and how I can prevent it cos im scared im doing damage to it.
im quite small in that region so no I am not sitting on it or rubbing against it.. its in a completely relaxed and unobstructed place.
So please help :-)
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#2
Hacchan,

I have never had that happen to me before. You might be experiencing some circulation problems. See a doctor as soon as possible. Let him evaluate what might be causing this situation.

I hope everything will turn out fine.

KnightShade
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#3
The bicycle seems to be putting pressure on the artery that feeds your nether regions, and as you're exercising, I'm guessing you are putting more pressure on it than if you were just sitting normally on a chair. Do see a doctor to see what they think about it. I think KnightShade is right, it's a circulation problem.
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#4
Might also be the seat on your bicycle, you might need to find a seat that fits you better anatomically, again, see the doctor and see what he says.
Richard
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#5
Do you do some warm up exercises before you begin your ride? If not...it is essential to do some warm up and also cool down exercises which may also help with circulation if that is the problem. Good luck to you!
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#6
Thankyou all for the replies.. although I hate doctors.. maybe I will go see him..
Also no I dont warm up.. I live with an annoying aunt so she gives me enough grief over biking without making more noise lol
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#7
I agree with the others, go get yourself checked out by a doctor.

I think what's happening is you're compressing nerves and cutting off the blood supply to the perineum. I bike but I'm no expert. Can you adjust the angle/position of your seat? You might want to check out no-nose/"no pressure" seats and change the one on your bike. Stay away from seats with a groove down the middle, because they end up still putting pressure on the area, just differently.

Maybe exercise in some bike shorts that have padding in that area.

But, definitely go see a doctor and get checked out and discuss potential ED from biking.
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#8
Some tips I found online about this:

What can be done to prevent perineal symptoms?

The variables that contribute to perineal symptoms during biking are complicated, and so it may be that you need to experiment with different strategies until you find the right one for you. Here are a number of suggestions that may help reduce the risk of perineal symptoms.

1. Stand up frequently on the pedals to take pressure off the perineum.

2. Change your position on the saddle while biking. Shift forward and backward when you ride to eliminate pressure on just one part of the perineum.

3. Experiment with adjusting the angle of your saddle so that it tilts slightly downward.

4. Wear bike shorts. They have chamois padding in the perineal area that will help relieve pressure.

5. Adjust the height of your handlebars slightly until you find a comfortable position. Handlebars below the saddle may work well for road or racing bikes, but perhaps not as well for touring or hybrids.

6. Make sure that your seat post is adjusted to the proper height. Your knee should be just slightly bent at the bottom of the pedal cycle.

7. Limit the number of miles that you pedal. This may not be desirable for all riders, but number of miles per week can be a factor.
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#9
Bookworm, we are talking about an steady exercise bike, not a normal riding bike. But maybe you got that bit?
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#10
Yes, I got that bit, thanks. The advice I was looking at was for outdoor cyclists but I thought the info was relevant, generally speaking.
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