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Do you make your own bread?
#1
I do, usually the lazy way using a bread making machine. I usually make a loaf a week using spelt flour. It's delicious but it never has a crusty top so today I tried something different.

This time, just using ordinary wholemeal flour purchased from the local supermarket, I made the loaf in the usual way but one hour before it finished, I took the dough out of the machine, placed it in a baking pan and baked it in the oven. I had read that putting a recipient with some water in it, in the oven at the same time, it helps to produced a crusty loaf.

The attached photos are the result. What do you think? It doesn't taste a good as spelt flour but it was an interesting experiment.


Attached Files Image(s)
       
"You can be young without money but you can't be old without money"
Maggie the Cat from "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof." by Tennessee Williams
#2
Spelt flour? Whats that? Never heard of it.

That bread looks GOOOOOOOOD!

I have a bread machine, and I make bread for people sometimes, when I need a gift and dont have enough money to buy something, I make them bread or cake.

Although last time I tried making bread, it didnt come out right....it was real runny for some reason, and I use the same recipe I always use.

I love sourdough bread, thats my fav!!! Dark breads are good too...Pumpernickel, Rye, German....

There is a small homestyle bread bakery store not to far from me. I've never had anything from there, they are expensive, but they make good money from that place.
#3
My grandmother baked bread in oven, that was really good. Too bad I didn't learn it from her.
Don't turn your back at me. I will grasp onto your neck and bite through your carotid artery.
#4
MisterTinkles Wrote:Spelt flour? Whats that? Never heard of it.

That bread looks GOOOOOOOOD!

I hope these will answer your question Tinks:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spelt

http://nutrition.about.com/od/grainsandc.../spelt.htm
"You can be young without money but you can't be old without money"
Maggie the Cat from "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof." by Tennessee Williams
#5
Crusty crust I get via using a cookie sheet that has a low lip. When the oven is hot (preheated) and ready for the dough, I microwave two cups of water for 3 minutes, getting if boiling hot, and pour that into the cookie sheet what sits on the shelf below the loaf pan(s).

I don't know why, but the steamy environment leads to a crustier crust, especially with whole or cracked wheat and other flours that are whole grain.

Butter (not margarine) melted and brushed over the top of the dough leads to a thicker crust that ends up tougher, more chewy. Egg white ends up making a crust more shinier, and and forming a harder crust which is very thin.

I used to bake with different artisan flours, specialty flours or 'hobby' flours. Different techniques lead to interesting results depending on the flour you use, the mixtures of flour.

Until my ulnar nerve transposition I did all my kneading by hand. Then I started using the hook on my kitche-aide and had to relearned how to knead dough with a machine. There were a few failures I that learning process. Too much kneading, not enough kneading...

I tend to knead it with the machine until its almost right, then dump it onto the counter and give it a massage for finishing purposes.

Understand that current weather can affect the overall texture of bread. Winter baking and summer baking can have a huge impact on the overall consistency, texture and crumb of a bread. The difference between a dry day and a rainy day can lead to epic failures or epic wins....

Humidity, and the temperature of the house as you let the dough sit for it to rise have impacts on the final outcome. Even the temperaure of the surface you are kneading the dough on can have a minor impact on how the yeasties do their thing.

My most used recipe uses half whole wheat (cracked wheat) and half white processed flour. Its over all texture, density, and crumb is acceptable to the picky person who is my roommate. I personally prefer 3/4 whole wheat with 1/4 flour, because I like the heavier density....
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[SIZE=4]I told you I had the body of a 25 year old....

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#6
I considered learning to make home made bread, but was told this method is more expensive than just buying it (is this true?), so I have never bothered.
#7
Woollyhats Wrote:I considered learning to make home made bread, but was told this method is more expensive than just buying it (is this true?), so I have never bothered.

The so called wholemeal breads on sale where I live are pretty awful. That's why I make my own. I've found that buy it is more expensive.
"You can be young without money but you can't be old without money"
Maggie the Cat from "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof." by Tennessee Williams
#8
Woollyhats Wrote:I considered learning to make home made bread, but was told this method is more expensive than just buying it (is this true?), so I have never bothered.

Yes, you can go buy a loaf of cheap bread for as low as $1.00.

If you buy a 5# bag of flour, and buy yeast, baking powder or baking soda (depending on what kind of bread you are making), it may cost about $20.00, but you will be able to make about 4-5 loaves. Yeah, thats almost $5 a loaf, but you make it yourself, and you know what went into it.

Plus, you can alter your recipes with shredded veggies, grated cheese, nuts, seeds, berries, grains, spices, etc......so you can have whatever bread you want.

My granny used to make Beer Bread sometimes. I hate Beer, but OMG it made the bread MORE "bready" tasting!!!! And I like that.

Beer Bread is also one of the cheapest breads to make. I will post a recipe for this on my recipe of the day thread...
#9
Bowyn Aerrow Wrote:Crusty crust I get via using a cookie sheet that has a low lip. When the oven is hot (preheated) and ready for the dough, I microwave two cups of water for 3 minutes, getting if boiling hot, and pour that into the cookie sheet what sits on the shelf below the loaf pan(s).

I don't know why, but the steamy environment leads to a crustier crust, especially with whole or cracked wheat and other flours that are whole grain.

Butter (not margarine) melted and brushed over the top of the dough leads to a thicker crust that ends up tougher, more chewy. Egg white ends up making a crust more shinier, and and forming a harder crust which is very thin.

I used to bake with different artisan flours, specialty flours or 'hobby' flours. Different techniques lead to interesting results depending on the flour you use, the mixtures of flour.

Understand that current weather can affect the overall texture of bread. Winter baking and summer baking can have a huge impact on the overall consistency, texture and crumb of a bread. The difference between a dry day and a rainy day can lead to epic failures or epic wins....

Humidity, and the temperature of the house as you let the dough sit for it to rise have impacts on the final outcome. Even the temperaure of the surface you are kneading the dough on can have a minor impact on how the yeasties do their thing.

Thanks for all that useful info. One thing is that I don't use butter, milk or margerine so that part of your info. is no use to me. I do know that different flours need different treatments. I have used a small proportion of rice flour at times and find with that I need much more liquid.

My recipe for my spelt flour bread is:

2 cups of water in the bread machine recipient first, 650 grammes of flour, a heaped teaspoon of dried yeast, salt to taste and then about 50 grammes each of sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds and linen seeds and then a good slosh of extra virgin olive oil. Everything goes in to the machine and three hours later I have my loaf. It's the lazy way of doing things but it never fails.
"You can be young without money but you can't be old without money"
Maggie the Cat from "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof." by Tennessee Williams
#10
MisterTinkles Wrote:My granny used to make Beer Bread sometimes. I hate Beer, but OMG it made the bread MORE "bready" tasting!!!! And I like that.

Beer Bread is also one of the cheapest breads to make. I will post a recipe for this on my recipe of the day thread...

Mmmmm, that sounds interesting and I may try that just using my standard recipe but substituting the water for beer. I'll be interested to see your recipe though.
"You can be young without money but you can't be old without money"
Maggie the Cat from "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof." by Tennessee Williams


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