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(Grammar help) meaning of "into"
#1
Hi all, I just encountered a usage of "into" that I don't understand:

"Two days into the trial, some evidence went missing."

Doesn it mean two days before the trial, or two days after the trial had started?

It seems weird to ask such a question here but it is the place where I can possibly find help from native English speakers, Many thanks!
#2
"Two days into the trial" would mean 2 days after the trail had started... think of it as progressing onward.

Not really a weird question coming from someone who is learning English.
Chickity China, the Chinese chicken
You have a drumstick and your brain stops tickin'


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#3
I just thought it would be unusual to ask this question in this forum Big Grin Thanks a lot!
#4
"Into" is a compartmentalized pair of adjectival nouns in the active-present, active-past auxiliary verb form:

"He goes in" - Shows movement
"He goes to" - Shows destination
"He goes into" - Shows movement within a space/time

So "Into" does essentially the job of the words "in" and "to", with the added case of a specific thing occurring or that already occurred.

"He moved in the house" - This just shows us motion and really not much else, though we can infer that he's living there, but grammatically it's incorrect.

"He moved into the house" - This shows a completed motion to a specific destination (the House) and so we know he's moved to the house and lives in it.


This rule can apply for a lot of things, such as with the phrase in your question, because it has to do with a specific time and in this case movement of the Trial.

So it's used more idiomatically in that sense, than in the literal example I gave.


English doesn't follow rules the same as most other languages do, especially ones from the Asian language family. (Trust me gurl, I know Japanese lol)
I luh de vibe enuh! Sheep

[Image: Bhq8UAkIUAEuRRT.jpg]


#5
Sylph Wrote:"Into" is a compartmentalized pair of adjectival nouns in the active-present, active-past auxiliary verb form:......

I AM a native English speaker with a science degree, and I don't know what the hell you just said....

~Beaux
Life is beautiful, and wonderful, and strange. Cool
#6
seeking Wrote:I just thought it would be unusual to ask this question in this forum Big Grin Thanks a lot!

You can ask anything here, it doesn't need to be sex related.
"You can be young without money but you can't be old without money"
Maggie the Cat from "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof." by Tennessee Williams
#7
Beaux Wrote:I AM a native English speaker with a science degree, and I don't know what the hell you just said....

~Beaux

Bitch, what's a degree got to do with the price of eggs?

It's simple:

Compartment of the words "in" and "to".

That becomes an auxiliary verb. "Into"

"Into" almost always follows the verb it's meant to help.

He goes into the castle.
She is 2 months into her pregnancy.


And "into" almost always infers a time when the action is or already has taken place.

Hence it being a present/past form auxiliary verb. "Active" simply shows that it implies action, as opposed to passivity:

"He wants to go into the house" -

This sentence is passive and contains 2 verbs and an auxiliary verb, which in a way negates the primary action verb wants, so it would be more grammatically correct to say:

"He wants to go to/in the house" -

As we now get more of a directional sense of the primary verb, without the uncomfortable negation of the auxiliary verb "into", because this sentence is passive.

As it simply lacks an action.


Does this make more sense my dear? I have only a Vet tech degree, but I know plenty languages and all of them follow rules pretty systematically and equally irregularly, so the are always gonna be exceptions;

However, languages aren't always logical Hun, so not even I know it all gurl. Elefant
I luh de vibe enuh! Sheep

[Image: Bhq8UAkIUAEuRRT.jpg]


#8
Here is something that may be helpful:

http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2015/...rsus-into/
I bid NO Trump!
#9
Sylph Wrote:Bitch, what's a degree got to do with the price of eggs?

It's simple:

Compartment of the words "in" and "to".

That becomes an auxiliary verb. "Into"

"Into" almost always follows the verb it's meant to help.

He goes into the castle.
She is 2 months into her pregnancy.


And "into" almost always infers a time when the action is or already has taken place.

Hence it being a present/past form auxiliary verb. "Active" simply shows that it implies action, as opposed to passivity:

"He wants to go into the house" -

This sentence is passive and contains 2 verbs and an auxiliary verb, which in a way negates the primary action verb wants, so it would be more grammatically correct to say:

"He wants to go to/in the house" -

As we now get more of a directional sense of the primary verb, without the uncomfortable negation of the auxiliary verb "into", because this sentence is passive.

As it simply lacks an action.


Does this make more sense my dear? I have only a Vet tech degree, but I know plenty languages and all of them follow rules pretty systematically and equally irregularly, so the are always gonna be exceptions;

However, languages aren't always logical Hun, so not even I know it all gurl. Elefant

Oh, drop the you condescending attitude "hon". The price of eggs is this: You needlessly complicated it for someone who's grasp of the English language is weak to begin with (similar to your grasp of manners).
~Beaux
Life is beautiful, and wonderful, and strange. Cool
#10
Beaux Wrote:Oh, drop the you condescending attitude "hon". The price of eggs is this: You needlessly complicated it for someone who's grasp of the English language is weak to begin with (similar to your grasp of manners).
~Beaux

Well first of all, I wasn't being condescending, sorry if you took it that way:

But it's simply the way I talk and so if you have a problem with that or my "weak grasp" on Manners,

You can easily lick the walls of my pussy and get your life hunny, because I'm not here to listen to your opinion on what really was a non-issue.


Don't think I don't know what you tried to say, but it's how you said what you did.

I know and learn other languages, but you don't have to bring your science degree and shit into this, because it means nothing in this and only made you come across as a bougie bitch.

You've known me long enough to know me and how I go on. Big Grin
I luh de vibe enuh! Sheep

[Image: Bhq8UAkIUAEuRRT.jpg]




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