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We've been pronouncing names incorrectly
#1
Well, it's nice to know that I have been pronouncing most of them correctly:

https://uk.style.yahoo.com/post/14357805...hese-brand
"You can be young without money but you can't be old without money"
Maggie the Cat from "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof." by Tennessee Williams
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#2
That's mostly because Europeans Syncopate their words off beat, whereas for us of the Caribbean Dialects and some Southern American dialects, Syncopate on beat, as is noticed with;

Adidas.

Vowel stress in our English follows a "Closed-Open-Closed" syntax, similar to Spanish; the second or second to last vowel is highlighted;

But Europeans I've noticed and some northern americans follow a "Open-Closed-Open" syntax, where the first or even last vowels are given precedence.

I've noticed this particularly when foreigners try to say:

Bermuda but end up saying "BAH-mu-DA"

When it should be said "Ber-MU-da" with a "sing song" incline on the "MU" sound.
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#3
i have no idea how to pronounce them in english - those red and green boxes looks like "excuse me, what? do you need help?" Big Grin

i know how to pronounce most of them irl and then try to understand the english version "t-hi-sss-and-t-hat". same way why y is like "j" when is yellow but then it is like "i" when "why" - it is the same fking letter! Tongue everyone says that my language is hard to learn but atleast it is written and pronounced on the same way all the time.

how many differend way can you say the watchmaker "lacroix"?

lakroyks, lakroo, lakwa, lackruu, lakruaaa...?


Sent from my iPad Air 2 using Tapatalk
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#4
mrex Wrote:i have no idea how to pronounce them in english - those red and green boxes looks like "excuse me, what? do you need help?" Big Grin

i know how to pronounce most of them irl and then try to understand the english version "t-hi-sss-and-t-hat". same way why y is like "j" when is yellow but then it is like "i" when "why" - it is the same fking letter! Tongue everyone says that my language is hard to learn but atleast it is written and pronounced on the same way all the time.

how many differend way can you say the watchmaker "lacroix"?

lakroyks, lakroo, lakwa, lackruu, lakruaaa...?


Sent from my iPad Air 2 using Tapatalk


Yes my dear;

English is one of the few truely "Idiomatic" Languages:

Meaning almost all that you See is not exactly what you Say. Also known as being Non-Phonetic.

Most languages are like this; But English, due to being influenced from it's very inception, barely follows many of its own "rules".

It's somehow highly analytical, but at the same time, extremely vague and for a non-native speaker; Nonsensical.


I.e:

Close - "Close the door"
Close - "Close to you"

Thought - is said "Thawt" but has nothing to do with the word "Thaw".


I understand ya hun Sheep
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#5
actually, the French pronunciations are not correct in that article.

you don't pronounce it either shev-ro-let or shev-ro-lay. both are wrong. it's more close to shev-ro-leh (or 'let' without the 't' pronounced and the 'e' sound extended). and 'ro' does definitely not become oh-ish, but keeps a straight 'o' like in the word 'or' (without 'r' pronounced).

in Renault, the 'e' becomes o like in 'worse' and it is not an 'e' like in 'end'. and the vowel part in 'nault' is prounounced exactly the same as 'o' in Chevrolet. it does not become an English 'oh' at any stage or by any stretch of imagination.

Givenchy, Balmain, Hublot (the 'blot' is very far from being pronounced like 'blow'), Jean Paul Gaultier, Yves Saint Laurent, Hermès also have wrong pronunciations in the article. it is completely incorrect on French pronunciations.
''Do I look civilized to you?''
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#6
True most French words are totally off track. But here for those who want to brush up on their French try this:

"Les chemises de l'archi-duchesse sont-elles sèchent ou archi sèchent."

Translation: Are the shirts of the archduchess are dry or extra dry?

It's obviously a tongue twister in French, but, this really help learners of French to practice diction and proper pronunciation.
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#7
meridannight Wrote:you don't pronounce it either shev-ro-let or shev-ro-lay. both are wrong. it's more close to shev-ro-leh (or 'let' without the 't' pronounced and the 'e' sound extended). s.

In my dialect of English (I think you'd call it Mid-Ulster English), the -lay in shev-ro-lay is close to the French pronunciation, except it is longer. Our -ay sound is a monophthong (it's like the French é sound / somewhere between eh and ee), as opposed to the common /eɪ/ sound (I Googled that). Funnily enough, /eɪ/ is how we (some of us) pronounce the /aɪ/ sound (as in isle, aisle, mile, etc.), here. So, I pronounce the word 'die' in the same way that many English people / Americans pronounce the word 'day'.

I've never heard anyone say Chevroletttttttt, before.

I don't think this was on the list but I used to think that English people pronounced 'Peugeo' as pur-zho. It's because many English accents are 'non-rhotic' (they don't pronounce r before consonants or at the end of a word (unless the following word starts with a vowel). The -eu sound in Peugeot sounds like how someone with a non-rhotic accent would say 'peurgeot'. It's the same when I heard English people saying Goebbels. I thought they were saying 'Gurbils'.
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#8
Never heard anyone pronounce Nike like "bike" or pronounce the T in Chevrolet or say Adidas in any other way than Ah-DEE-das. I do hear the mispronunciations for Nutella, Ikea, and Stella Artois fairly often (though most people here just call it "Stella" to avoid the risk). As for most of the others, can't really say, I haven't even heard of a lot of them. I'm not surprised that the article would get the French ones wrong though.
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#9
Ah yes, this is common.

Although I'm pleased to notice at least I and some folks close to me are using correct form on several of these. Hehe, oh but I do notice the local proclivity to forget the silent "T"s and such.

Yup. French. Bloody French. Of all the languages I've either been forced to or looked by myself to learn, it takes the crown as the most complicated one. Then again I'm not interested in learning Japanese, so maybe that one is worse :biggrin:

Whatever I learned in those 2-3(?) of French in school have been completely erased from my head :eek:
[Image: 05onfire1_xp-jumbo-v2.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp]
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#10
imagine Chinese and all its dialects from mandarin to Cantonese to Taiwanese, etc...good thing it's all written using the same radicands! Smile
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